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Dale Oak

Lead, Appropriations

Dale Oak joined Federal Budget IQ as a consultant in July 2017 after over more than 30 years working on federal budget and appropriations matters in government and the private sector. Decades of senior staff experience help Mr. Oak anticipate budget and appropriations developments and translate facts and figures into actionable information.

Mr. Oak’s most recent government position was Senior Advisor to the Chairman of the U.S. House Committee on Appropriations (HAC). Several chairmen relied on Mr. Oak’s appropriations expertise to provide guidance to the twelve appropriations subcommittees and help them navigate their bills through the legislative process to enactment.

He also served in several other roles during his 20 years with HAC. From 2007 to 2009, Mr. Oak served as the first Staff Director of the Financial Services and General Government Appropriations Subcommittee. He was HAC’s lead budget numbers and scorekeeping expert from 1999 to 2006 and managed the Committee’s information systems from 1995 to 1998.

Mr. Oak served a total of six HAC Chairmen, both Republican and Democratic, including, most recently, Rodney P. Frelinghuysen (R-NJ).

In 2009, Mr. Oak left HAC to work in the private sector as a Principal for a leading government relations and public affairs firm where he serviced clients ranging from Fortune 500 federal contractors to small nonprofit organizations. He returned to the Committee in 2011.

Before joining HAC in 1995, Mr. Oak worked at the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). At OMB, he analyzed appropriations bills and participated in the development of the President’s annual budget.

Mr. Oak graduated from the Anderson Graduate School of Management at UCLA in 1987 with a Master of Business Administration in Finance and Public/Not-for-Profit Management. Prior to attending graduate school, he was a Legislative Assistant for Rep. John R. McKernan (R-ME). He received a Bachelor of Arts degree at Colby College in Maine in 1981. He and his wife divide their time between northern Virginia and Maine.